ISFS2 in TOKYO(2013.07.27)

July 27th, 2013 | Kioicho Campus, Josai International University

  • Time :14:30-18:30, July 27th, 2013
  • Title : "Towards the Frontiers of 21st Century Science Fiction: Translation, Japan, Planetary Imagination"
  • Place :Kioicho Campus, Josai International University
    102-0094 Kioi-cho 3-26 Chiyoda-ku Tokyo [GoogleMap]
  • Admission : Free, No reservation is needed.
  • Language : Japanese-English simultaneous interpretation
  • Coordinator : Reiichi Nakao (Visiting assistant professor, Josai International University)

Timetable

  Time Moderator, Panelists
Opening Speech 15:00 - 15:15 Tohno Tsukasa (Science Fiction Writer. The 17th President of SFWJ. Chairman of SFWJ50.)
Part1
"The World, the Text, and the Science Fiction Translator"
15:15 - 16:30 Toastmaster : Mamoru Masuda
Moderator : Dana Lewis
Panelists : Mitsuyoshi Numano, Fumio Takano, Susumu Niijima, Mamoru Masuda
Intermission (15 min.)
Part2
"History, Japan, and the Alien Planet"
16:45 - 18:15 Moderator : Takayuki Tatsumi
Panelists : Paolo Bacigalupi, Pat Murphy, Yan Wu, Denis Taillandier, Baku Yumemakura, Koshu Tani

Introducing Overseas Guest Writers

Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi

Highly appraised as a masterpiece recalling "both William Gibson and Ian McDonald at heir very best"(Publishers Weekly) and an important book describing "An extraordinary, virtuoso, shock-immersion rendering of a transformed world"(John Clute, SCI FI Wire), his first novel The Windup Girl (2009; tr. Kazue Tanaka & Hiroshi Kaneko, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2011) has won incredibly numerous and prestigious awards such as: the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, the Locus Award, the Compton Crook Award, the John W. Campbell Award, and the Seiun Award. His next novel Ship Breaker (2010; tr. Kazue Takana, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2012) was nominated for the National Book Award. His third novel The Drowned Cities (2012) is a finalist for the L.A.Times Book Prize. His short story "The Calorie Man" (2005; tr. Naoya Nakahara & Hiroshi Kaneko, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2012) included in Pump Six and Other Stories (2008) won the Theodore Sturgeon Award.
windupstories.com - fiction by paolo bacigalupi

Pat Murphy

Pat Murphy

In 2002, her novel There and Back Again (by Max Merriwell), translated by Hisashi Asakura (Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers), won the Seiun Award for best foreign novel in translation. Her other awards include two Nebula Awards, the Philip K. Dick Award, the World Fantasy Award, and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. She has published eight novels and many short stories, including Rachel in Love, The Falling Woman, The City Not Long After, Nadya, and Adventures in Time and Space with Max Merriwell, a novel that Publisher's Weekly called the "cerebral equivalent of a roller-coaster ride." Her children's novel, The Wild Girls, was awarded a Christopher Award in 2008. She also authored three science books for adults and fifteen science activity books for children, including Star Wars Folded Flyersand Paper Flying Dragons. Her science writing has been honored with the American Institute of Physics science communications award. In 1991, with writer Karen Fowler, Pat co-founded the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender roles.
http://www.brazenhussies.net/murphy/

Yan Wu

Yan Wu

He has many faces: a science fiction author, a science fiction anthologist and a professor and Director of the Research Center for Science Fiction and Creative Education in the Faculty of Education at Beijing Normal University, PRC. Yan Wu published the novels Xin Ling Tan Xian [Adventure in the Deep Soul, 1996] and Sheng Si Di Liu Tian [Life and Death on the Sixth Day, 1996], and nonfiction studies including Ke Huan Wen Xue Lun Gang [The Essentials of Science Fiction, 2011], and Ke Huan Ying Gai Zhe Yang Du [How to Read Science Fiction, 2012], as well as numerous edited series of fiction and criticism related to science fiction.  He is the current president of the World Chinese Science Fiction Association and vice-chair of the Science Literature Branch of China Science Writers' Association. His participation or promotion has invariably invigorated international conferences such as: "Hong Kong 2001:Technology, Identity, Futurity, East and West, In the Emerging Global Village" at the Chinese University of Hong Kong " and a Sino-US Science Fiction Summit at Beijing Normal University in 2007.

Denis Taillandier

Denis Taillandier

Being a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute for Transtextual and Transcultural Studies of Lyon 3 Jean-Moulin University, France, he studied Japanese science fiction at Keio University in 2009 and started teaching French as a fulltime non-tenure lecturer at Ritsumeikan University in 2010. He is also giving an introductory course on Japanese science fiction at Otemon Gakuin Univeristy. Taillandier delivered a number of papers with special emphasis on the interactions between literature and advanced technology such as: "Nanotechnology Through the Lenses of Science-Fiction: How Japanese Manga Acts as a Critical Translation of Science Worldviews" presented at the International Convention of Asia Scholars ICAS 6, Daejeon Convention Center, Korea in August, 2009. What makes his career conspicuous is that he made a debut as a science fiction critic in Japan by winning the 8th Japan Science Fiction Criticism Award with his ambitious article "Aramaki Yoshio's Flabby Engineering: Science Fiction, Surrealism and the Nano Imagination " written in Japanese and published in the May 2013 issue of Hayakawa's SF Magazine.

Introducing Japanese Guest Writers

Mitsuyoshi Numano

Mitsuyoshi Numano

Literary critic, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Contemporary Literary Studies at The University of Tokyo, President of the Japanese Association for the Study of Russian Language and Literature since 2009. His main academic interests include: modern Russian and Polish literature, contemporary Japanese literature, comparative world literature, and Russian and East European Fantastic literature and Science Fiction. Books written by Numano include: Seen by Dreams: Fantastic Literature of Russia and Poland (Sakuhinsha Publishers, 1990); The Slavic Vacuum (Jiyu-Kokuminsha Publishers, 1993); A Queue of Sleepless Nights: On Émigré Literature (Sakuhinsha Publishers, 2002, the winner of the 24th Suntory Foundation Prize for Humanities); A Queue of Sleepless Nights II: On Utopian Literature (Sakuhinsha Publishers, 2003, the winner of the 55th Yomiuri Literary Prize); From World Literature / Toward World Literature: Collected Essays in Literary Criticism 1993-2011 (Sakuhinsha Publishers, 2012). He has translated, among others, Lem (Solaris), Nabokov (The Gift), Alexander Grin, Joseph Brodsky into Japanese.

Fumio Takano

Fumio Takano

Educated in French history and music, she prefers to consider herself as a "fantastica novelist." She made her debut in 1995 with a steampunk novel Musica Machina, a finalist for the sixth Japan Fantasy Novel Award co-sponsored by Shinchosha Publishers,Yomiuri Shimbun, and Shimizu Corporation, which was selected as one of Japan's best 30 works of science fiction from the 1990s. Takano has very easily transgressed the boundary between cyberpunk and steampunk, as is seen in such masterpieces as Canto Angelico (1996), a widescreen baroque featuring an eighteenth century castrato whose song has fatal effects on the listeners, and Vaslav (1998), an alternate historical cyberpunk featuring a talented dancer Vaslav Nijinsky resurrected as a computer program. She lately compiled Time Waits for No Man, the first anthology in Japan of East European science fiction and fantastica from the first decade of the 21st century. It brings together 12 stories from 10 countries, each translated directly into Japanese from its original language. In 2012 she won the 58th Edogawa Rampo Award, the Japanese equivalent of the Edgar Award with her latest science fiction mystery A Sister of Karamazov.

Susumu Niijima

Susumu Niijima

Associate Professor of Modern French literature at Keio University (Tokyo, Japan). Being one of the founders of Japan Jules Verne Society, he authored and edited Yokohama as Described by Jules Verne --- Rereading Around the World in Eighty Days (Keio U, 2010). He translated into Japanese Raymond Roussel's The Star on the Forehead (Jimbun-Shoin Publishers), Jacques Baudou's Science-Fiction (Hakusuisha Publishers), Raymond Queneau's The Blue Flowers (Suiseisha Publishers) and more. His new translation of Michel Carrouges' The Celibate Machine (Toyo-Shorin Publishers) will be due out in the fall of 2013.

Baku Yumemakura

Baku Yumemakura

Author of science fiction and fantasy. He graduated from Tokai University with a degree in Japanese literature, and made his debut as a writer in 1977. His bestseller series includes: "Psyche Diver," "Chimera," and "Hunting Master." He received numerous literary awards: the 12th Japan SF Grand Prize in 1989 for The Lion that Ate the Moon (Hayakawa Publishers, 1989); the 11th Shibata Renzaburo Award in 1998 for The Summit of the Gods (Shueisha, 1997); the Izumi Kyoka Prize for Literature and the Seiichi Funahashi Prize for Literature in 2011 and also the Yoshikawa Eiji award in 2012 for his historical novel Fishing as a Way of Edo Life (Kodansha Publishers, 2011). In 2001 Reiko Okano's manga adaptation of Yumemakura's seminal work "The Ying and Yang Master "won the 5th annual Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize, while Jiro Taniguchi's manga adaptation of his work The Summit of the Gods won the award of excellence at the Japan Media Arts Festival. A number of his works such as "The Ying and Yang Master" have been adapted into films.

Koshu Tani

Koshu Tani

Author of hardcore science fiction. the 13th president of SFWJ. As an active member of JOCV (Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers) and also as a volunteer member of JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) he spent years in the Kingdom of Nepal and the Republic of the Philippines. In 1979 he made his debut with "137 Mobile Brigade," the runner-up for the 2nd Kiso Tengai SF Rookie of the Year Award. He won a variety of prestigious awards such as: the 18th Seiun Award in 1987 for his short story "Martian Railroad 19;" the 25th Seiun Award In 1994 for his novel Endless Search for the Enemy (Hayakawa Publishers, 1993); the 15th Nitta Jiro Culture Award in 1996 for his novel White-Peaked Man (Shueisha Publishers, 1995); the 38th Seiun Award in 2007 for the novel Japan Sinks: Part II (Shogakuan Publishers, 2006), which he co-wrote with Sakyo Komatsu.

Introducing the Moderators

Takayuki Tatsumi

Takayuki Tatsumi

Literary critic and professor of American literature and Literary Theory at Keio University (Tokyo, Japan). He authored Cyberpunk America (Tokyo: Keiso Publishers, 1988; the 1988 Japan-US Friendship Commission's American Studies Book Prize) and Full Metal Apache: Transactions between Cyberpunk Japan and Avant-Pop America: (Durham: Duke UP, 2006; the 2010 IAFA Distinguished Scholarship Award), and co-edited the Japanese Science Fiction issue of Science-Fiction Studies (29.3[November 2002]) and Robot Ghosts, Wired Dreams: Japanese Science Fiction from Origins to Anime (Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2007). He won the 5th Pioneer Award (SFRA) in 1994 with the collaboration essay with Larry McCaffery "Towards the Theoretical Frontiers of 'Fiction': From Metafiction and Cyberpunk through Avant-Pop"(1993)," and the 21st Japan SF Grand Prize (SFWJ) in 2001 with his edited anthology Japanese SF Controversies:1957-1997(Tokyo: Keiso Publishers, 2000). He also published numerous essays in SF Eye, Extrapolation, Para*Doxa, American Book Review, Mechademia, PMLA and elsewhere.

Dana Lewis

Dana Lewis

Tanslator, journalist, and member of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America since 1972. She served as president of the Northern California Japan Society. Her published translations of Japanese science fiction with their date of first publication include: Tensei Kono's "Triceratops" (Omni, August 1982), "Light" (Speculative Japan, 2007), Yasutaka Tsutsui's "Standing Woman" (Omni, February 1981), "The Africa Bomb" (The Africa Bomb and Other Stories, 1986), "The Rumors About Me" (The Africa Bomb and Other Stories, 1986), Koichi Yamano's "Where Do the Birds Fly Now?" (Speculative Japan, 2007), Ryo Hanmura's "Cardboard Box" (Pacific Moana Quarterly, July 1979), Hiroe Suga's "Freckled Figure" (Interzone, March 1999[*With Stephen Baxter]).

Introducing the Toastmaster and panelist

Mamoru Masuda

Mamoru Masuda

Speculative fiction translator. The Executive Secretary of SFWJ. His translated works include: Thomas M. Disch, 334; J. G. Ballard, The Unlimited Dream Company, Rushing to Paradise, Millennium People; Eric P. McCormack, The Paradise Mortel, The Mysterium; George R. R. Martin, Fever Dream; Iain Banks, Feersum Endjinn,; Sheri Tepper, The Gate to Women's Country,; Richard Calder, Dead Girls and Dead Boys.

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