ISFS2 in OSAKA(2013.07.22)

July 22nd, 2013 | Knowledge Salon, Knowledge Capital

  • Time : 18:00-20:30, July 22nd, 2013
  • Title : "Towards the Frontiers of 21st Century Science Fiction: Robot, AI, Creativity"
  • Place : Knowledge Salon, Knowledge Capital
  • Opening Speech : Takayuki Tatsumi (Literary critic and professor of Literary Theory at Keio University. Chairman of ISFS2.)
  • Toastmaster : Mamoru Masuda
  • Moderator : Macoto Kikuchi
  • Panelists : Paolo Bacigalupi, Pat Murphy, Yan Wu, Denis Taillandier, Jouji Hayashi, Masayoshi Yasugi, Sayuri Ueda, Yusaku Kitano, Katsura Hattori
  • Admission : Free, No reservation is needed.
  • Coordinator : Kunihiro Tsuji (Researcher, The University of Tokyo / Producer, Knowledge Capital)

Introducing Overseas Guest Writers

Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi

Highly appraised as a masterpiece recalling "both William Gibson and Ian McDonald at heir very best"(Publishers Weekly) and an important book describing "An extraordinary, virtuoso, shock-immersion rendering of a transformed world"(John Clute, SCI FI Wire), his first novel The Windup Girl (2009; tr. Kazue Tanaka & Hiroshi Kaneko, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2011) has won incredibly numerous and prestigious awards such as: the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, the Locus Award, the Compton Crook Award, the John W. Campbell Award, and the Seiun Award. His next novel Ship Breaker (2010; tr. Kazue Takana, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2012) was nominated for the National Book Award. His third novel The Drowned Cities (2012) is a finalist for the L.A.Times Book Prize. His short story "The Calorie Man" (2005; tr. Naoya Nakahara & Hiroshi Kaneko, Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers, 2012) included in Pump Six and Other Stories (2008) won the Theodore Sturgeon Award.
windupstories.com - fiction by paolo bacigalupi

Pat Murphy

Pat Murphy

In 2002, her novel There and Back Again (by Max Merriwell), translated by Hisashi Asakura (Tokyo: Hayakawa Publishers), won the Seiun Award for best foreign novel in translation. Her other awards include two Nebula Awards, the Philip K. Dick Award, the World Fantasy Award, and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. She has published eight novels and many short stories, including Rachel in Love, The Falling Woman, The City Not Long After, Nadya, and Adventures in Time and Space with Max Merriwell, a novel that Publisher's Weekly called the "cerebral equivalent of a roller-coaster ride." Her children's novel, The Wild Girls, was awarded a Christopher Award in 2008. She also authored three science books for adults and fifteen science activity books for children, including Star Wars Folded Flyersand Paper Flying Dragons. Her science writing has been honored with the American Institute of Physics science communications award. In 1991, with writer Karen Fowler, Pat co-founded the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender roles.
http://www.brazenhussies.net/murphy/

Yan Wu

Yan Wu

He has many faces: a science fiction author, a science fiction anthologist and a professor and Director of the Research Center for Science Fiction and Creative Education in the Faculty of Education at Beijing Normal University, PRC. Yan Wu published the novels Xin Ling Tan Xian [Adventure in the Deep Soul, 1996] and Sheng Si Di Liu Tian [Life and Death on the Sixth Day, 1996], and nonfiction studies including Ke Huan Wen Xue Lun Gang [The Essentials of Science Fiction, 2011], and Ke Huan Ying Gai Zhe Yang Du [How to Read Science Fiction, 2012], as well as numerous edited series of fiction and criticism related to science fiction.  He is the current president of the World Chinese Science Fiction Association and vice-chair of the Science Literature Branch of China Science Writers' Association. His participation or promotion has invariably invigorated international conferences such as: "Hong Kong 2001:Technology, Identity, Futurity, East and West, In the Emerging Global Village" at the Chinese University of Hong Kong " and a Sino-US Science Fiction Summit at Beijing Normal University in 2007.

Denis Taillandier

Denis Taillandier

Being a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute for Transtextual and Transcultural Studies of Lyon 3 Jean-Moulin University, France, he studied Japanese science fiction at Keio University in 2009 and started teaching French as a fulltime non-tenure lecturer at Ritsumeikan University in 2010. He is also giving an introductory course on Japanese science fiction at Otemon Gakuin Univeristy. Taillandier delivered a number of papers with special emphasis on the interactions between literature and advanced technology such as: "Nanotechnology Through the Lenses of Science-Fiction: How Japanese Manga Acts as a Critical Translation of Science Worldviews" presented at the International Convention of Asia Scholars ICAS 6, Daejeon Convention Center, Korea in August, 2009. What makes his career conspicuous is that he made a debut as a science fiction critic in Japan by winning the 8th Japan Science Fiction Criticism Award with his ambitious article "Aramaki Yoshio's Flabby Engineering: Science Fiction, Surrealism and the Nano Imagination " written in Japanese and published in the May 2013 issue of Hayakawa's SF Magazine.

Introducing Japanese Guest Writers

Joji Hayashi

Joji Hayashi

Alternate historicist and hard science fictionist. He made debut with a series of alternative history The Empire of Japan storming Europe (Hiten Publishers & KSS Publishers, 1995-1997, co-written). Since 2000 he has constantly published hard science fiction series "AADD" such as The Ouroboros Wave (Hayakawa Publishers, 2005) and The Silence of Stringer (Hayakawa Publishers, 2005). His other masterpieces include Contagion of Memory (Hayakawa Publishers, 2003) and The Designer of Evolution (Hayakawa Publishers, 2007).
Website

Masayoshi Yasugi

Masayoshi Yasugi

Science fiction writer. He made debut in 2003 with his first novel A Dreaming Cat Sleeping in Space (Tokuma Publishers), the winner of the 5th Japan SF New Talent Award. His latest novel Delivery (Hayakawa Publishers, 2012) was selected as finalist for the 33rd Japan SF Grand Prize. He also served as the first editor-in-chief of SFWJ's web magazine SF Prologue Wave (2011-13).
SFWJ's web magazine SF Prologue Wave 

Ueda Sayuri

Sayuri Ueda

Science fiction writer. Deeply intrigued by Sakyo Komatsu's Japan Sinks, a million seller of 1973, she started reading science fiction masters such as: Yasutaka Tsutsui, Arthur C. Clarke, James Tiptree, Jr., and William Gibson. Therefore, it is very natural that she made her debut by winning the 4th Sakyo Komatsu Award in 2003 with her first novel Mars Dark Ballad (Kadokawa Haruki Publishers). Her second novel The Cage of Zeus (Kadokawa Haruki Publishers, 2004) is translated by Takami Nieda into English and published by Haikasoru Publishers in the United States. She also published a short fiction collection, Fin and Claw (Kobunsha Publishers, 2009), whose title story was nominated for 2010 Seiun Award and translated into Japanese by Daniel Huddleston (included in Speculative Japan 3 [Kurodahan Press, 2012]). In 2011 she won the 10th Sense of Gender Award, the Japanese equivalent of the Tiptree Award and the 32nd Japan SF Grand Prize with The Ocean Chronicles (Hayakawa Publishers, 2010), which could well be called the 21st century version of Japan Sinks.
Website

Yusaku Kitano

Yusaku Kitano

Science fiction writer and actor. He made debut with Where Mars Used to be in 1994, the runner-up for the 4th Japan Fantasy Novel Award. In 2001 he received the 22nd Japan SF Grand Prize in 2001 with Kame-Kun (Cyber-Turtle, Tokuma Publishers, 2001) and the first Jakusaburo Katsura Rakugo (Comic Storytelling) Award with "Geocentric Theory." So full of puns, the titles of his major works are always untranslatable: Kitsune no Tsuki (The Possessed; Kawade Publishers, 2010), Doronko-Rondo (Muddy Rondo; Fukuinkan Publishers, 2011), and Hitode no Hoshi (The Star of Starfish: Kawade Publishers, 2013).
Website

Katsura Hattori

Katsura Hattori

Science Journalist and translator. Senior researcher of Asahi Institute of Journalism. After studying in MIT Media Lab in the 1980s, he worked as editor-in-chief for computer magazines ASAHI Pasokon (Asahi Personal Computer), Doors and PASO. Deeply interested in the rise of the cyberpunk movement and the expansion of cyberspace, he published What's Virtual Reality? (Kogyo Chosakai Publishers, 1991), which won the Science and Technology Studies Book Award of Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun (the Business and Technology Daily News), whose circulation is around 420,000. He recently translated Tom Standage's The Victorian Internet (1998) and The Turk (2003), the first of which gave impacts upon Project Itoh and Enjoe Toh's collaboration novel Empire of the Corpses (Kawade Publishers, 2012).

Introducing the Moderator

Macoto Kikuchi

Macoto Kikuchi

Professor of Large-Scale Computational Science Division, the Cybermedia Center of Osaka University, science fiction translator, and semi-professional thereminist. He published books focusing on the difference and similarity between hard science and pseudo-science such as: Between Science and Mystery (Chikuma Publishers, 2010) and How to Discern the Verisimilitude of Fake Science (Kobunsha Publishers, 2011, co-written). His translated works include: Philip K. Dick, Nick and the Glimmung and Mary and the Giant.
Website "kikulog" 

Introducing the Toastmaster

Mamoru Masuda

Mamoru Masuda

Speculative fiction translator. The Executive Secretary of SFWJ. His translated works include: Thomas M. Disch, 334; J. G. Ballard, The Unlimited Dream Company, Rushing to Paradise, Millennium People; Eric P. McCormack, The Paradise Mortel, The Mysterium; George R. R. Martin, Fever Dream; Iain Banks, Feersum Endjinn,; Sheri Tepper, The Gate to Women's Country,; Richard Calder, Dead Girls and Dead Boys.

Japanese